Animal Welfare Approved

Archive for January, 2013

A Meat-Free Superbowl Party? Not For Me…

By Andrew Gunther | January 30, 2013

As I join the 110 million or so Americans who will watch the San Francisco 49ers take on the Baltimore Ravens this Sunday, we will collectively chomp our way through an incredible 1.23 billion chicken wings, plus millions of burgers, hot dogs and steaks. That’s a staggering amount of meat.

La Ferme Saint-Vincent – Saint-Cuthbert, Quebec

By Animal Welfare Approved | January 23, 2013

Yves Saint-Vincent’s father wanted him to follow in his own footsteps and become a firefighter. But instead, Yves chose to follow in his grandfather’s footprints and began a conventional dairy and beef operation, in 1958. However, after many years of conventional production, Yves woke one day and said, “Enough!” He sold his herd and spent two years traveling the world with his wife, Diane, visiting farms in many countries and, as Yves says, “learning from intelligent farmers, raising animals differently.”

Pozo Organic Farm – Santa Margarita, CA

By Animal Welfare Approved |
A_Pozo Organic Farm

While both Dana Tryde and Eric Michielssen had grandparents that worked the land, their parents chose to leave the family farms. But when the couple first met in 1999, Dana and Eric quickly learned of their similar family legacies and their shared interest in returning to the land. In 2002, they established Clark Valley Farm and Horse Boarding in Los Osos, California, where they ran a diverse organic produce operation and sustainably-managed horse facility. In 2010, they settled at Pozo Organic Farm in the tiny community of Pozo, 25 miles east of San Luis Obispo. In addition to the horses that Dana and Eric brought from the old farm and the row crops, berries, and fruit trees they are growing, the farm is now home to laying hens, meat chickens, and breeding chickens—all Certified AWA. As a Certified AWA chicken breeder, Pozo Organic Farm is approved to raise and sell live chickens to other AWA farms.

Crescent Creek Farm – Perry, AR

By Animal Welfare Approved |

Will French raises Certified AWA pigs in central Arkansas, just outside of Little Rock. Will began farming when he was around 14 years old: “I started with my Grandpa, who had a small herd of beef cows,” Will explains. “I started farming pigs at my current farm in 2008 with my wife Sarah. We purchased two feeder pigs and fed them out. A short time later we purchased a Hampshire sow and have managed pigs ever since.”

Cambridgeshire Farm – Oakboro, NC

By Animal Welfare Approved | January 18, 2013
A_Cambridgeshire Farm

Shawn and Jenny Hatley raise Certified AWA pigs in the North Carolina Piedmont. As far back as 1000 A.D., the Hatleys have been well established in and around Cambridge, England, giving rise to the farm’s name. As the fourth generation of Hatleys to manage the family farm in Oakboro, NC, Shawn and Jenny are building on tradition while innovating for the future.

Heather Ridge Farm – Preston Hollow, NY

By Animal Welfare Approved | January 11, 2013
Heather Ridge Farm

Carol Clement and John Harrison raise Animal Welfare Approved lamb, goats, and pigs at Heather Ridge Farm in Preston Hollow, New York. Stretching up and over a small peak in the Catskill Mountain Range, the 160 acres of hill land have been farmed for over 200 years. Originally a dairy operation, Heather Ridge Farm is now a multi-species, pasture-based livestock operation which offers a wide range of products to local customers.

Big Ag Profits from Food Waste

By Andrew Gunther | January 10, 2013

We know that most of the world’s hungry live in the developing nations in the South. They are hungry because they cannot afford to buy food or grow it themselves, usually because of poverty, but also due to conflict, poor infrastructure, poor agricultural practices, and the over-exploitation of the environment, among other things. They are also hungry because much of their agricultural production is focused on generating food and livestock feed to supply Western markets. Recent price rises caused by harvest failures, commodity speculation, and the diversion of grain to produce biofuels over recent years have hardly helped matters (see for example Tom Philpott’s excellent blog on the horrendous impact U.S. biofuels policy is having on global food prices – and hunger).